Alopecia statistics in Spain and in the European countries

Alopecia is a medical disorder that affects a significant number of people all over the world. This is a condition that leads to hair loss, and depending on the severity, it may be temporary or permanent. There are several subtypes of alopecia, the most common of which are androgenetic alopecia, alopecia areata, and telogen effluvium. The prevalence and incidence of alopecia varies from country to country, despite the fact that it is a disorder that affects people all over the world. In the following paragraphs, we will investigate the prevalence of alopecia across Europe, focusing specifically on Spain.

Alopecia Statistics in Spain

Spain is a country that can be found in the South-Western part of Europe and has a population of more than 47 million people. There is a lack of readily available information concerning the incidence and prevalence of alopecia in Spain. However, Androgenetic alopecia affects approximately half of all males in Spain by the time they reach the age of 50, according to a study that was published in 2019. In addition, it is estimated that approximately 2% of the population of Spain is affected by alopecia areata, a type of alopecia that results in patchy hair loss on the scalp and other parts of the body.

In addition, the research showed that men have a higher risk of developing alopecia compared to women. It is not known what the prevalence of alopecia is among women, but it is estimated that approximately 15% of women in Spain will suffer from hair loss at some point during their lives. More so, the findings of the study demonstrated that alopecia has a significant influence on the overall quality of life of those who are afflicted by it, particularly in terms of the affected individuals’ sense of self-worth and their participation in social life. Due to the high price of treatment and hair replacement systems, alopecia is also associated with a significant amount of financial strain.

 

Alopecia Statistics in Other European Countries

The incidence of alopecia in other European countries differs not only according to the type of alopecia but also the location in which the country is located. Androgenetic alopecia is the most frequent kind of alopecia in Europe; it affects almost half of the males and a third of the women over the age of 50. Alopecia areata is a condition that affects roughly 0.1% to 0.2% of the population in the United Kingdom. Over sixty percent of all cases are diagnosed in patients who are under the age of twenty, indicating that the ailment is more prevalent in younger age groups.

The incidence of alopecia areata is significantly higher in Italy, where around 2.2% of the population is affected by the condition. There is a correlation between alopecia areata and other autoimmune illnesses, such as thyroid disease and vitiligo. Alopecia areata is more common in women than in males, and women are more likely to be affected.

More so, it is believed that between 0.1 and 0.2 percent of the population in Germany suffers from alopecia areata at any given time. This disorder has a tendency to be more prevalent in younger age groups, and it is frequently related with a history of autoimmune conditions in the patient’s family.

Also, it is believed that around 0.2 percent of the population in France is affected by alopecia areata. The illness is typically connected with other autoimmune conditions, such as atopic dermatitis and allergic rhinitis, and it is more prevalent in younger age groups than in older age groups on average.

Alopecia statistics

Types of Alopecia Common in Spain and Other European Countries

  1. Androgenetic Alopecia

Androgenetic alopecia is the most common type of alopecia, affecting both men and women. It is a hereditary condition that results in gradual hair loss, usually starting at the crown or hairline. The prevalence of androgenetic alopecia varies widely across Europe, with some countries having a higher prevalence than others.

According to the study, the highest prevalence of androgenetic alopecia was found in Spain, where it affects approximately 50% of men by the age of 50. Other countries with a high prevalence of androgenetic alopecia include the Czech Republic, where it affects approximately 42% of men, and France, where it affects approximately 38% of men.

On the other hand, countries with a low prevalence of androgenetic alopecia include Finland, where it affects approximately 10% of men, and Norway, where it affects approximately 11% of men.

  1. Alopecia Areata

Alopecia areata is a type of alopecia that results in patchy hair loss on the scalp and other parts of the body. It can occur at any age, and it affects both men and women. The prevalence of alopecia areata also varies across Europe.

According to the study, the highest prevalence of alopecia areata was found in Spain, where it affects approximately 2% of the population. Other countries with a high prevalence of alopecia areata include Turkey, where it affects approximately 1.9% of the population, and Italy, where it affects approximately 1.3% of the population.

Countries with a low prevalence of alopecia areata include Finland, where it affects approximately 0.07% of the population, and Norway, where it affects approximately 0.1% of the population.

  1. Telogen Effluvium

Telogen Effluvium is a type of alopecia that occurs when the body undergoes a traumatic event, such as surgery, pregnancy, or extreme stress. It can also be caused by certain medications or medical conditions. The prevalence of telogen effluvium is not well documented, but it is estimated to be relatively common.

According to a study published in the Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology in 2018, the prevalence of telogen effluvium ranges from 0.1% to 2.8% across Europe. The study found that telogen effluvium is more common in women than men, and it can occur at any age.

Countries with a high prevalence of telogen effluvium include Italy, where it affects approximately 2.8% of the population, and Spain, where it affects approximately 1.5% of the population. Countries with a low prevalence of telogen effluvium include Finland, where it affects approximately 0.1% of the population, and Norway, where it affects approximately 0.3% of the population.

Impact of Alopecia

  1. Alopecia can have a significant impact on a person’s quality of life. It can cause anxiety, depression, and low self-esteem, particularly in women.
  2. Hair loss can also affect a person’s social life and job prospects.
  3. In some cases, alopecia can be a symptom of an underlying medical condition, such as thyroid disease or lupus.
  4. The financial burden of alopecia can also be significant. Treatment for alopecia can be costly, particularly for those who opt for hair replacement systems or hair transplants.
  5. Finally, the emotional toll of alopecia can also lead to lost productivity at work and increased healthcare costs.

 

 

 

Treatment for Alopecia

While there is no cure for alopecia, there are various treatments available that can help to slow down or reverse hair loss. The type of treatment recommended will depend on the type and severity of alopecia.

  1. For androgenetic alopecia, treatments may include medications such as minoxidil and finasteride, which can help to slow down hair loss and promote hair regrowth.
  2. Hair transplant surgery is also an option for those with more advanced hair loss.
  3. For alopecia areata, treatments may include topical corticosteroids or immunotherapy, which involves injecting a medication into the scalp to stimulate hair growth.
  4. For telogen effluvium, treatment may involve addressing the underlying cause of the hair loss, such as stopping the medication or reducing stress levels.

Conclusion

Alopecia is a widespread medical illness that impacts the hair and scalp of millions of people all over the world. The frequency and prevalence of alopecia varies from country to country in Europe; nevertheless, research indicates that androgenetic alopecia and alopecia areata are the two kinds of alopecia that are most frequently seen. Alopecia can have a considerable influence on a person’s quality of life, and the burden of financial responsibility associated with its treatment can also be substantial. Although there is no known cure for alopecia, there are a number of therapies that, depending on the kind and severity of the condition, can assist to stop or even reverse the hair loss that occurs as a result of the condition.

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